Australian Planetary Research

This is the Australian node of NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute [SSERVI].

Australia is home to scientific and technological expertise in understanding Solar System origins and evolution. The SSERVI Australia node aims to strengthen national planetary research and extend collaborations with the international community.

Explore our Research themes below, connect with our Team, discover Australian Science on Space Missions and view our Recent Publications.

News and research highlights

Astrobiology & the Queensland Youth Lecture Series

Astrobiology & the Queensland Youth Lecture Series

SSERVI Australia members are out and about in Queensland schools for Australian Institute of Physics: The hunt for exoplanets and extra-terrestrial life. Over the next month, astrobiologist Jonti Horner and planetary scientist Helen Maynard-Casely will be touring schools in Brisbane, Mt Isa, Gold Coast, Toowoomba, Townsville and Cairns. For more details head to http://www.aip.org.au/info/?q=article/congress-deadline-and-physics-tours-physics-july

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MetSoc Abstracts from SSERVI Australia

MetSoc Abstracts from SSERVI Australia

Heading to Berlin in August? You may catch some SSERVI Australia team members at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society www.metsoc-berlin.de/ They have released their full program here: http://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/metsoc2016/ and we’ll be highlighting those featured in the lead up. Congratulations to SSERVI Australia team member Luke Daly from Curtin University, who won the Brian Mason Award from the Meteorite Times ...

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Ancient micrometeorites suggestive of an oxygen-rich Archaean upper atmosphere

Ancient micrometeorites suggestive of an oxygen-rich Archaean upper atmosphere

The work of SSERVI Australia planetary scientsits Andy Tomkins, Lara Bowlt, Matthew Genge, Siobhan A. Wilson, Helen E. A. Brand,  Jeremy L. Wykes was published this week in Nature: Ancient micrometeorites suggestive of an oxygen-rich Archaean upper atmosphere – Nature 533, 235–238 (12 May 2016) doi:10.1038/nature17678 World’s oldest fossil micrometeorites ever found contain hints of oxygen in early Earth’s atmosphere – ABC Science News, 11 May 2016 World’s ...

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Discovering the bath scum on Titan using the Australian Synchotron

Discovering the bath scum on Titan using the Australian Synchotron

Australian planetary scientist Helen Maynard-Casely at the Australian Synchrotron has been working with scientists at JPL to uncover the crystal structure of ‘bath scum’ on Titan. A co-crystal between benzene and ethane: a potential evaporite material for Saturn’s moon Titan –  IUCrJ 3, 192-199, May 20 Synchrotron used to find structure of a new material that could be ...

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Planetary Materials research at ANSTO

Planetary Materials research at ANSTO

As of January 2016 the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has added the theme of Planetary Materials to its research.  This is in recognition of the value that the facilities that are operated by ANSTO can be to Planetary science.  At present the aims of the Planetary Materials work at ANSTO are: To support ...

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Discovery of ancient rare mineral Reidite will help explain early solar system

Discovery of ancient rare mineral Reidite will help explain early solar system

Australian geoscientist Steven Reddy explains in The Conversation what their discovery last year means for early Earth and Solar System research. The international team published their discovery of precambrian-aged reidite minerals in Geology in Septemer 2015. “We are currently looking for evidence of older reidite and are exploring how deformation associated with reidite formation may modify the ...

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Community Outreach

Bringing planetary science to schools, events, science festivals, teachers, parents and online

  • @Scientific Troy

    The crew of @Fireballssky taught my kids to identify meteorites. Now my daughter wants to check every rock she can find.

    @Scientific Troy
  • Congrats on the NASA Affiliation!

    @High5forscience